Wordy Wednesday

words

WORDY: using or containing many (usually too many) words

I embrace Wednesdays in my own way. In lieu of a photo, I offer you this random collection of other people’s words that impacted me this week as well as a handful of new words I added to my vocabulary.  I acknowledge that I am offering you less than the going exchange rate of 1,000 words per picture.  Forgive me.

Other People’s Words


I love when I’m reading fiction and come across a truth spoken with artful clarity. Here are a few great truths about motherhood capture in fiction:

From Diana Gabaldon in Dragonfly in Amber: Babies are soft. Anyone looking at them can see the tender, fragile skin and know it for the rose-leaf softness that invites a finger’s touch. But when you live with them and love them, you feel the softness going inward, the round-cheeked flesh wobbly as custard, the boneless splay of the tiny hands. Their joints are melted rubber, and even when you kiss them hard, in the passion of loving their existence, your lips sink down and seem never to find bone. Holding them against you, they melt and mold, as though they might at any moment flow back into your body.  But from the very start, there is that small streak of steel within each child. That thing that says “I am,” and forms the core of personality.

From Barbara Kingsolver in The Poisonwood Bible: A first child is your own best foot forward, and how you do cheer those little feet as they strike out. You examine every turn of flesh for precocity, and crow it to the world. But the last one: the baby who trails her scent like a flag of surrender through your life when there will be no more coming after–oh, that’s love by a different name.

From Jodi Picoult in Perfect Match: Sometimes when you pick up your child you can feel the map of your own bones beneath your hands, or smell the scent of your skin in the nape of his neck. This is the most extraordinary thing about motherhood – finding a piece of yourself separate and apart that all the same you could not live without.

 

Words I Had to Ask Webster About


  • Alacrity: a quick and cheerful readiness to do something
  • Meretricious: tawdrily and falsely attractive, superficially significant
  • Sangfroid: the ability to stay calm in difficult or dangerous situations

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2 thoughts on “Wordy Wednesday

  1. I love these quotes from authors I have read. So evocative for me at this moment as I await the birth of my daughter’s first child in about 5 weeks. Thank you!

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